Man Law for Churches

August 2, 2006 by

Bob Franquiz of Calvary Fellowship in Florida is proposing Man Law for Christians, including the inaugural law that men shouldn’t have to hold hands with other men while praying. It’s reminiscent of (and more entertaining than) the Why Do Men Hate Church discussion.

He follows up that manly post with an announcement that his wife is pregnant. [In your best Duffman voice:] Oh yeah!

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Kevin D. Hendricks


When Kevin isn't busy as the editor of Church Marketing Sucks, he runs his own writing and editing company, Monkey Outta Nowhere. Kevin has been blogging since 1998 and has published several books, including 137 Books in One Year: How to Fall in Love With Reading, The Stephanies and all of our church communication books.
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2 Responses to “Man Law for Churches”

  • The Aesthetic Elevator
    August 2, 2006

    This brings to mind though a snippet from my intercultural commications course in college. The professor, from a country in Africa (Nigeria, IIRC), shared this story:
    His brother came from Africa to the states to visit. In their first culture, men holding hands was very common. And they were brothers. So the professor goes to the airport to pick his brother up, and they are very glad to see each other, but as they are walking through the concourses out of the airport the brother keeps trying to hold the professor’s hand — and the professor keeps letting go, trying not to offend the brother, for fear observers would think them gay. He finally, as I recall, tried to explain to his brother the culture here in the states and how holding hands as men was not done. I don’t think his brother understood.


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  • Jim V
    October 2, 2006

    This is a good idea. The scenario is to have everyone stand and hold hands for an opening prayer before a church volleyball game, for example. If I get stuck between two men, I’ll look for two women holding hands and go there, claiming to be a recovering homosexual.


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