Poll Results Suck

August 29, 2005 by

Is 'sucks' a swear word? poll resultsThe results are in for last week’s poll asking if ‘sucks’ is a swear word. 57% said “@#*%, no!” which means if a simple majority decided morality we’d be good to go.

13% said “Yes (I’ll pray for you.)” which seems like a high number to dislike the word and still visit our site, though maybe they just think we need prayer. And we’ll take that. My hat goes off to anyone willing to keep coming back to our site even if they won’t repeat our name (to which we constantly point people to our rationale for using sucks and to our alternate url).

30% took the wishy-washy “I’m not sure”/”Depends” approach, which probably means something.

Tune in this week for a poll on church size: Is your church mega, mini or medium? (Or as 11% of survey-takers have said so far, “Me? Go to church? Ha!”)

Post By:

Kevin D. Hendricks


When Kevin isn't busy as the editor of Church Marketing Sucks, he runs his own writing and editing company, Monkey Outta Nowhere. Kevin has been blogging since 1998 and has published several books, including 137 Books in One Year: How to Fall in Love With Reading, The Stephanies and all of our church communication books.
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6 Responses to “Poll Results Suck”

  • Michael
    August 29, 2005

    I had to say depends simply because my 13 year old gets ‘the look’ when he uses it. Truth be told, I hadn’t paid it any attention until I realized it was kind of a catch-all word for the boy…but I am blessed that all it takes is a look and problem solved.


  • Suzi
    August 29, 2005

    I teach part-time at a Christian school. There the word sucks is a “yes, I’ll pray for you” curse word.
    I’ve used it before and decided it isn’t very articulate. “That sucks.” What does that mean? “That bites” hurts. “That stinks” smells. “That is a very poor implementation of a mediocre marketing strategy” articulates. (Okay, I couldn’t resist.)


  • Paula
    August 29, 2005

    Depends what culture you live in. There’s words that my friends and I use in every day living that have quite a different meaning in other parts of the world. (in western culture). There’s even words that are used in the US that have different meanings over here.


  • Paula
    August 29, 2005

    Oh, and for the survey, I picked medium church, even though our church is the 4th biggest(AOG) church in australia


  • Scott Z
    August 30, 2005

    The only reason I chose the seemingly wishywashy “It depends” is because when talking to my grandmother I would still be threatened with a mouth-washing if I used the word SUCKS. So, it only depends because the older generation are still around and involved in church. Well, I don’t mind using it. So, carry on, my friends.


  • Phillip Ross
    September 5, 2005

    From http://www.dictionary.com:
    suck v. sucked, suckĀ·ing, sucks
    v. tr.
    1. To draw (liquid) into the mouth by movements of the tongue and lips that create suction.
    2.
    1. To draw in by establishing a partial vacuum: a cleaning device that sucks up dirt.
    2. To draw in by or as if by a current in a fluid.
    3. To draw or pull as if by suction: teenagers who are sucked into a life of crime.
    3. To draw nourishment through or from: suck a baby bottle.
    4. To hold, moisten, or maneuver (a sweet, for example) in the mouth.
    5. Vulgar Slang. To perform fellatio on.
    v. intr.
    1. To draw something in by or as if by suction: felt the drain starting to suck.
    2. To draw nourishment; suckle.
    3. To make a sound caused by suction.
    4. Vulgar Slang. To be disgustingly disagreeable or offensive.
    n.
    1. The act or sound of sucking.
    2. Suction.
    3. Something drawn in by sucking.
    Phrasal Verbs: “suck in:” To take advantage of; cheat; swindle.
    I will assume that your intended meaning is the second vulgar slang. The first vulgar slang suggests the problem of being offensive.
    Phil



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